Recently-discovered underwater volcano named for this popular franchise

A bunch of researchers in Australia has uncovered the remnants of an historic underwater volcano within the Indian Ocean that resembles J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy’s “Eye of Sauron.”

As described in “The Fellowship of the Ring,” the Eye of Sauron was “lidless” and “wreathed in flame,” and sonar photos offered by chief scientist and senior curator at Museums Victoria Tim O’Hara present a well-recognized define. 

Announcing the find in the publication The Conversation, O’Hara wrote that the volcano was revealed slowly utilizing multibeam sonar at a depth of 10, 170-feet beneath Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization’s (CSIRO) ocean analysis vessel RV Investigator round 174 miles southeast of Christmas Island and on the twelfth day of the workforce’s voyage to Australian’s Indian Ocean Territories.

“Previously unknown and unimagined, this volcano emerged from our screens as a giant oval-shaped depression called a caldera, 3.8 miles by 2.9 miles across. It is surrounded by a 984 [foot]-high rim (resembling Sauron’s eyelids), and has a 984 [foot] high cone-shaped peak at its…[center](the “pupil”),” he defined. 

The Eye of Sauron from The Lord of the Rings trilogy.
The Eye of Sauron from The Lord of the Rings trilogy. As described in “The Fellowship of the Ring,” the Eye of Sauron was “lidless” and “wreathed in flame.”
New Line

According to the U.S. National Park Service, a caldera is fashioned after a large volcanic eruption when the stress contained in the volcano is decreased and the “empty system of conduits and shallow reservoirs” are now not in a position to assist the burden of the mountain above it and the volcano collapses downward. 

The company notes that calderas will be greater than 15.5 miles in diameter and a number of other miles deep and are sometimes round in form.

O’Hara notes that whereas undersea volcanic eruptions might fly beneath the radar, a tell-tale signal is the presence of rafts of sunshine pumice stone floating on the floor following the geological occasion.

Sonar images provided by chief scientist and senior curator at Museums Victoria Tim O'Hara show a familiar outline to the Eye of Sauron.
Sonar photos offered by chief scientist and senior curator at Museums Victoria Tim O’Hara present a well-recognized define to the Eye of Sauron.
Phil Vandenbossche & Nelson Kuna

In addition to the undersea volcano, additional three-dimensional mapping found two different seafloor constructions. 

Also named for Tolkein’s fantastical lore, a “flat-topped seamount” and volcanic cone-covered sea mountain have been dubbed Barad-dûr and Ered Lithui – each situated close to the Eye of Sauron within the hellish wasteland of Mordor. 

“Although author J.R.R. Tolkein’s knowledge of mountain geology wasn’t perfect, our names are wonderfully appropriate given the jagged nature of the first and the pumice-covered surface of the second,” O’Hara famous. 

According to the U.S. National Park Service, a caldera is formed after a massive volcanic eruption when the pressure inside the volcano is decreased and the "empty system of conduits and shallow reservoirs" are no longer able to support the weight of the mountain above it and the volcano collapses downward.
According to the U.S. National Park Service, a caldera is fashioned after a large volcanic eruption when the stress contained in the volcano is decreased and the “empty system of conduits and shallow reservoirs” are now not in a position to assist the burden of the mountain above it and the volcano collapses downward.
Tim O’Hara

All three options are a part of a cluster of seamounts which were beforehand estimated to be greater than 100 million years outdated and which had fashioned subsequent to an historic sea ridge when Australia was positioned nearer to Antarctica than Asia.

While Ered Lithui was fashioned by wave erosion – as soon as protruding above the floor earlier than sinking – O’Hara factors out that the caldera seems a lot more energizing than its sand and mud-covered neighbor.

“Instead it is possible that volcanoes have continued to sprout or new ones formed long after the original foundation,” he stated. “Our restless Earth is never still.”

Next, O’Hara and others from museums, universities, CSIRO and Bush Blitz are getting ready to map the encompassing seafloor and journey to the Cocos (Keeling) Island area.

“No doubt many animals that we find here will be new to science and our first records of their existence will be from this region,” he stated. “We expect many more surprising discoveries.”

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